Auditorium 1

Auditorium 2

Workshop 1

Workshop 2

Workshop 3

08:00

Registration and coffee

09:00

Opening plenary

9:30

  Politically Incorrect Agile

Tiago Garcez

  Sustainable agile testing

Domenico Musto

  Delegation is an Art

Johan Tré &
Annelies De Meyere

Max: 40 
  User Story Mapping - A Crash Course

Frances Place

Max: 20 
  Agile & Lean Impediment Game

Ben Linders

Max: 20 

10:30

Break

11:00

  Facts and Fallacy of Continuous Delivery

Thierry de Pauw

  Responsibility model

Jan De Baere &
Gertjan Deserrano

  A Poet's Guide to Acceptance Testing

George Dinwiddie

User Story Mapping - A Crash Course

CONTINUED

Agile & Lean Impediment Game

CONTINUED

12:00

Lunch

13:00

Afternoon opening plenary

13:30

    Create cooperation within an organization through an "agile" budget process

Michel Van den Borne

  Hands on session: Splitting up a problem into microservices

Erik Talboom &
Koen Metsu

Computer
Max: 20 
  Eat your own dog food

Valentin Vlacic &
Artur Margonari

  More with LeSS

Nelis Boucké &
Alexander Helleboogh

Max: 30 

14:30

Break

15:00

  Develop Healthy Relationships at Work Using the Integral Theory and Integral Coaching

Peter Moreno

  Where does it hurt?

Marc Lainez

  Everyone can write concurrent code using Test Driven Design? Inconceivable!

Pascal Van Cauwenberghe &
Thien Que Nguyen

Max: 30 
  Agile4HR... Hacking corporate culture

Pierre E. Neis

  Lean UX: getting out of the deliverables business

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

16:30

Closing plenary

17:00

Drinks



Legend
Technology and Technique
Customer and Planning
Team and Individual
Process and Improvement
Other

Session descriptions

Politically Incorrect Agile

Tiago Garcez

You always hear about the benefits of Agile, and how great the Promised Land of Agility is. Many times probably by people who earn their living selling some consulting on the topic (guilty as charged, your honor). And here's the thing - it is great!

But... what are the consultants, coaches and trainers not telling you? What's it like "under-the-hood"? What are some practical things you need to know about working in an Agile environment that perhaps you're not warned about upfront? What happens to annoying people in Scrum? Do Agile coaches work in "Agile" organisations themselves? What do you do when a manager just doesn't "get it"... but thinks he does? Do big consultancies actually know anything about Agile? And do they really believe in it? Are we losing all our ScrumMasters to the freelance coaching/training market? What happens when the manager who hired you as a coach is actually the root cause for many of the problems he's complaining about?

Intended audience: Anybody
Expected experience: A basic knowledge of Agile topics is probably necessary. Some experience working with Agile methods such as Scrum is a plus.
Session Type: 60 min interactive presentation

You always hear about the benefits of Agile, and how great the Promised Land of Agility is. Many times probably by people who earn their living selling some consulting on the topic (guilty as charged, your honor). And here's the thing - it is great!

But... what are the consultants, coaches and trainers not telling you? What's it like "under-the-hood"? What are some practical things you need to know about working in an Agile environment that perhaps you're not warned about upfront? What happens to annoying people in Scrum? Do Agile coaches work in "Agile" organisations themselves? What do you do when a manager just doesn't "get it"... but thinks he does? Do big consultancies actually know anything about Agile? And do they really believe in it? Are we losing all our ScrumMasters to the freelance coaching/training market? What happens when the manager who hired you as a coach is actually the root cause for many of the problems he's complaining about?

Let's take a look at the topics, stories and discussions you don't usually hear about when discussing Agile. With some humor, a lot of candour, and some interesting questions, this talk will take a look at Agile from a different perspective - a behind-the-scenes look into a movement that's trying to change the world of work.

Jan
Marieke
Leo
Bram
Philippe
Georges
Vincent
Joke
Hank
Ellen

Back to program

Sustainable agile testing

Domenico Musto

The agile community has done a very good job over the last few years in re-thinking the software development process and practices. What about testing though ? Are we really agile about it ? For most companies testing and QAs are still a bottleneck. In this session we will explore practices and techniques which will enable us to bring testing to the next level. We will focus particurarly on the concept of acceptance tests driven development and the role played by the "software developer in test"

Expected experience: anyone
Session Type: 60 min interactive presentation

The agile community has done a very good job over the last few years in re-thinking the software development process and practices. What about testing though ? Are we really agile about it ? For most companies testing and QAs are still a bottleneck. In this session we will explore practices and techniques which will enable us to bring testing to the next level. We will focus particurarly on the concept of acceptance tests driven development and the role played by the "software developer in test"


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max
40

Delegation is an Art

Growing Self-Managing Teams

Johan Tré & Annelies De Meyere

How do you manage to empower teams in such a way that it is useful and beneficiary to the organisation? As we support many organisations we have discovered a lot of helpful tools and techniques: RACI, LRC, DACI, Situational Leadership… and many more. All of them have some truth in them but there is only one that we experienced working 8 out of 10 times instead of occasionally: “Delegation Poker” in combination with “Authority Boards”.

Goal of the session: Understand how to grow Self-Managing teams
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen, Marieke, Hank
Expected experience: None
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning

In this rapidly changing world where change itself has changed, we need more people to be part of the system to provide evolutionary, disruptive and open innovation! Internet connections, data storage, mobile devices, genome sequencing, everything today is growing at an exponential rate where organisations need to be more adaptive, and change as fast as change itself.

*Top-down controlled, managed organisations are bound to die* as there is no time to aks for permission! The only way to survive in this new world is to get your organisation to engage with their (potential) customers and with their employees in order to find the change it needs to survive within this jungle of opportunities. *Being slow is not an option anymore!* Producing low quality is not an option anymore! Neglecting your customers is not an option anymore!

One of the options at hand is to *grow self-managing mechanisms within your organisation that are empowered to swiftly act upon the opportunities* at hand.

But how do you manage to empower teams in such a way that it is useful and beneficiary to the organisation? As we support many organisations we have discovered a lot of helpful tools and techniques: RACI, LRC, DACI, Situational Leadership… and many more. All of them have some truth in them but there is only one that we experienced working 8 out of 10 times instead of occasionally: “Delegation Poker” in combination with “Authority Boards”.

In this hands-on session we'll let you discover the power of those 2 techniques yourself and be able to apply them in your day-2-day work (even private) life.

Marieke
Leo
Bram
Georges
Vincent
Joke
Hank
Ellen

Back to program

max
20

User Story Mapping - A Crash Course

How to do it and why you should use it for all your projects

Frances Place

User story mapping is a technique for scoping and prioritising requirements for projects.
This workshop is a crash course in how to do user story mapping and why you should be using it on your projects.
It’ll be a hands-on, interactive session for anyone who’s interested in different ways of exploring backlogs with clients.

Goal of the session: Everyone should go away knowing how to begin using this technique.
Intended audience: No prior knowledge required, although understanding of and interest in the basics of agile methodology and writing user stories is helpful.
Session Type: 120 min experiential learning

User story mapping is a technique for scoping and prioritising requirements for projects.
This workshop is a crash course in how to do user story mapping and why you should be using it on your projects.

I want you to go away actually knowing how to do it, so it’ll be a hands-on, interactive session.
I recently held a sold-out, oversubscribed workshop at thebigdo.dopm.co.uk, a one-day project management conference in Oxford, UK. The feedback I had from participants was that it was an interactive, engaging session and they can't wait to try out what they've learnt- hopefully you will enjoy it too!


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max
20

Agile & Lean Impediment Game

Ben Linders

If you want to become agile and lean, teams need to be able to handle impediments quickly and effectively. This game teaches you to recognize and analyse impediment and to take appropriate action by deploying agile and lean good practices.

In this game you will be a team which has been working together for a couple of iterations. The game can be played by 1-4 teams simultaneously. Each team will has Scrum master and a Product Owner. The game consists of a deck of impediment cards, a list of agile and lean good practices, and an impediment board. During the game the teams will be coached in understanding impediments and selecting and deploying good practices to take action.

Session Type: 120 min game/simulation

If you want to become agile and lean, teams need to be able to handle impediments quickly and effectively. This game teaches you to recognize and analyse impediment and to take appropriate action by deploying agile and lean good practices.

Many organizations are going through agile transformations. They are implementing Scrum and maybe large scale agile framework like SAFe or DAD, hoping to better serve the IT needs of the business and to develop products that satisfy their customers. Unfortunately those transformation do not always live up to the agile promise to deliver faster, make better products that customers really like or reducing the IT costs. One of the reasons that transformation fail is that team get blocked while working agile due to impediments, and are unable to solve them themselves or to involve their stakeholders or managers and have them solved.

In this game you will be a team which has been working together for a couple of iterations. The game can be played by 1-4 teams simultaneously. Each team will has Scrum master and a Product Owner. The game consists of a deck of impediment cards, a list of agile and lean good practices, and an impediment board. During the game the teams will be coached in understanding impediments and selecting and deploying good practices to take action.

You will play +/- 15 rounds. Each round has the same sequence:
• A team member takes an impediment card from the stack and reads it out loud
• Team discusses the impediment, agrees how it hinders the team
• Team members apply agile and lean practices to deal with the impediment
• Team decides on actions and assign the impediment to who should do the actions

After playing the rounds the teams looks at the impediment board to inspect and adapt how they are dealing with the impediments. Things to look for are:
• Are the actions clear? Are they feasible?
• Are there any actions which are related? Can they be combined?
• How are the actions distributed over the responsible persons? Is there a bottleneck?
• Do the actions really address the root causes of the impediments?


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Facts and Fallacy of Continuous Delivery

Thierry de Pauw

Continuous Delivery brings a lot of value to your organisation. It will allow you to reduce your time to market for new features and bug fixes. It is a significant predictor of company performance.

But what does it mean for your organisation to implement Continuous Delivery ? And what does it involve ?

Goal of the session: Understand the mindset behind Continuous Delivery, its benefits and the requirements it imposes on a software development team.
Intended audience: Vincent, Georges, Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Hank, Joke
Expected experience: You do not need a technical background to attend this session. You just need some understanding of the software development cycle and how software is installed in production.
Session Type: 60 min interactive presentation

Continuous Delivery brings a lot of value to your organisation. It will allow you to reduce your time to market for new features and bug fixes. It is a significant predictor of company performance.

Continuous Delivery is more than just tooling. It is also a mindset.

During this session we will not talk about how to implement Continuous Delivery. Although you will get a short introduction to it. The session will be more about the mindset you need to have in order to successfully implement Continuous Delivery. And it'll highlight some facts … And a fallacy (or two) that exist in the minds of decision makers preventing them to take the leap forward.

Jan
Marieke
Leo
Bram
Georges
Vincent
Joke
Hank

Back to program

Responsibility model

Jan De Baere & Gertjan Deserrano

leadership is 99% self leadership. Do you consider yourself to be a responsible person? Why? In what ways?
Think about somebody you know who is very responsible.
How does that person demonstrate responsibility?

In this session we dig a little deeper in the mental states discovered by Christopher Avery when researching responsiblity.

Goal of the session: Learn and apply the responsibility model of Christopher Avery.
Session Type: 60 min interactive presentation

leadership is 99% self leadership. Do you consider yourself to be a responsible person? Why? In what ways?
Think about somebody you know who is very responsible.
How does that person demonstrate responsibility?

In this session we dig a little deeper in the mental states discovered by Christopher Avery when researching responsiblity.


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A Poet's Guide to Acceptance Testing

George Dinwiddie

The crucial aspect of test automation is creating clear and expressive descriptions of the system being built. It’s easy to write tests that a computer can understand. But can you write tests that people, even non-technical people, can understand? Will it be obvious whether or not the test is correct? This is not a matter of dumbing things down.

Highlight the concepts. Express just the right details. There is a synergy between the expressiveness of tests and the maintainability.

Achieving clarity in natural language is essential for their long-term viability. Come get some hints on expressing your tests clearly and succinctly.

Goal of the session: How to develop automated tests that communicate better by - Noticing the effect of word choice - Selecting words for clarity and descriptiveness - Describing the assumed context
Expected experience: Basic familiarity with Acceptance Tests, Behavior Descriptions, or Specification by Example
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning

When first starting out with automated acceptance tests, people are often happy just to get them to run correctly. Soon, however, they start finding they have to rewrite their old scenarios when new features are added. Or they disable some scenarios "for now" so they can continue to make progress. Newcomers need explanations to understand the tests. So do the business analysts. It even takes you awhile to figure out some of the older tests. Then, one day, the VP stops by, asking about them...

The crucial aspect of test automation is creating clear and expressive descriptions of the system being built. It’s easy to write tests that a computer can understand. But can you write tests that people, even non-technical people, can understand? Will it be obvious whether or not the test is correct? This is not a matter of dumbing things down.

Highlight the concepts. Express just the right details. There is a synergy between the expressiveness of tests and the maintainability. Achieving clarity in natural language is essential for their long-term viability. Come get some hints on expressing your tests clearly and succinctly.


Back to program

Create cooperation within an organization through an "agile" budget process

Michel Van den Borne

The Agile Manifesto is a wonderful inspiration for the company budget process. Applying agile methods during this exercise generates clear decisions and fruitful cooperation that allows reaching collective goals.

In fact, you can consider the company budget process as the best team building event you can organize!

Goal of the session: 1) Explore the opportunities to introduce agile methods in non-IT domains (e.g. Finance and Strategy). 2) Review tools and techniques easing cooperation in negotiations and conflict handling. 3) Create conditions for efficient decision-making and commitments. 4) Discover a « provocative » way to manage the budget process in an organization.
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: No
Session Type: 60 min interactive presentation

The budget process within an organization is a wonderful opportunity to reinforce cooperation and openness between team members, and take engaging decisions.
In fact, you can consider the company budget process as the best team building event you can organize!

In this speech I will describe an accelerated budget process, held in two weeks and several workshops, and generating the active participation and commitment of the Management.

Too often the budget process is counter-productive in terms of collaboration and powerful decisions:
- It is long, energy-consuming and frustrating
- There is a lack of transparency regarding data sharing and the decision-making process is unclear for a lot of participants
- There are competitions between departments/managers. This can lead to conflicts, « silo-organizations, absence of team-spirit (personal objectives are more important than collective ones)
- It is perceived as a « dull financial exercise » disconnected from the reality of the workers or the evolution of the market strategy
- It does not create mobilization and the decisions taken during this process are not followed

Concretely, the proposed approach offers the following advantages:
- A yearly budget built and approved in a few days
- A strong reduction of the time spent on the budget process, coupled with drastic cost decrease
- A collaborative and transparent decision-making process leading to true commitments
- A full integration between budget figures, company mission, vision and strategy
- A reinforcement of the team cohesion and the development of a cooperative culture

I believe that the Agile Manifesto is a wonderful inspiration for the company budget process. Applying agile methods during this exercise generates clear decisions and fruitful cooperation that allows reaching collective goals.
Therefore, talking about budgets is talking about human collaboration and true commitments.

Leo
Bram
Philippe
Georges
Vincent
Joke
Hank
Ellen

Back to program

max
20
Laptop

Hands on session: Splitting up a problem into microservices

Erik Talboom & Koen Metsu

Based on my experience facilitating code retreats I have had many similar questions and challenges over the last few years. One concept that I challenge every single pair on at some time is the single responsibility principle. When developing different concepts of one problem it is very easy to break single responsibility, just because it is convenient to do so.

During this session we will do a short modelling exercise on a given problem after which we will split the group in pairs. Each pair chooses their own domain concept to work on and creates a microservice around this concept. When you need something from another concept, you will go and talk to the pair that is implementing this concept and agree on a service contract so that you can continue your implementation. Together we will also agree on how our microservices will communicatie with each other. Preferably in a way that we don't all have to work in the same language.

Expected experience: Please bring along your laptop with your favourite development environment set up. And prepare for web development if possible.
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning

Based on my experience facilitating code retreats I have had many similar questions and challenges over the last few years. One concept that I challenge every single pair on at some time is the single responsibility principle. When developing different concepts of one problem it is very easy to break single responsibility, just because it is convenient to do so.

During this session we will do a short modelling exercise on a given problem after which we will split the group in pairs. Each pair chooses their own domain concept to work on and creates a microservice around this concept. When you need something from another concept, you will go and talk to the pair that is implementing this concept and agree on a service contract so that you can continue your implementation. Together we will also agree on how our microservices will communicatie with each other. Preferably in a way that we don't all have to work in the same language.

Please bring along your laptop with your favourite development environment set up. And prepare for web development if possible.


Back to program

Eat your own dog food

Our journey to reinvent ourselves as an Agile company

Valentin Vlacic & Artur Margonari

Even with an agile DNA, we sometimes find it challenging to work according to the agile values and principles we are so fond of. Mostly because it's more challenging to implement Agile in a company which is not a software house.

Many impediments, iterations and attempts later, we've reinvented all of our processes, implemented new tools and adopted new practices. Through this session, we want to share with you this journey with all its failures & successes, the benefits and the challenges still lying ahead of us.

Goal of the session: How to apply Agile outside of IT
Intended audience: Everybody
Session Type: 60 min interactive presentation

Even with an agile DNA, we sometimes find it challenging to work according to the agile values and principles we are so fond of. Mostly because it's more challenging to implement Agile in a company which is not a software house.

We asked ourselves: what does Agile mean for us on the inside? And in general, what does working in the agile way mean for a consulting company? That’s when some members of our team gathered around this subject and started working on it. In short sprints, with daily synchros, retrospectives, more face-to-face, transparency, collaboration and commitment.

Many impediments, iterations and attempts later, we've reinvented all
of our processes, implemented new tools and adopted new practices. Through this session, we want to share with you this journey with all its failures & successes, the benefits and the challenges still lying ahead of us.

Jan
Marieke
Leo
Bram
Philippe
Georges
Vincent
Joke
Hank
Ellen

Back to program

max
30

More with LeSS

Truly Scale Business Agility in Product Development

Nelis Boucké & Alexander Helleboogh

An interactive session where we are going to apply one of the key principles of LeSS: *Systems Thinking*. Together we will *explore one of the main factors of pain* in Large-Scale Scrum adoptions. Doing so we'll discover *better ways to scale Agile in large organisations* without fancy titles, no trains, no layers of management having more business Agility and less parts.

Goal of the session: Understand how to use Systems thinking when scaling Agile in organisations and how it relates to LeSS
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: Understanding of Scrum, Agile in general
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning

  • Large? *Don't*
  • Multisite? *Don't*
  • Offshoring? *Don't*

But it is a reality we have to live with and for those product development companies going towards several thousands of people in their R&D, it is causing huge problems and pains.

In this interactive session we are going to apply one of the key principles of LeSS: *Systems Thinking*. Together we will *explore one of the main factors of pain* in Large-Scale Scrum adoptions. Doing so we'll discover *better ways to scale Agile in large organisations* without fancy titles, no trains, no layers of management having more business Agility and less parts.

Possible discoveries for the attendees related to Scaling Scrum with LeSS:

__In empirical process control__
more learning & adaption, less prescription & following
*more root-cause countermeasures, less quick fixes*
more safety & transparency, less fear & opacity
more on principles, less on practices

__In scaling__
*more system, less parts*
*more customer-feature teams, less roles, silos, overhead, handoff, scatter*

__In agile values__
more organisational agility & learning, less “work the plan”

__In lean thinking__
more teaching, less telling
*more value, less muri, muda, mura*

__In impact mapping & value-driven management__
more outcomes, less outputs

Are you ready to discover how to truly scale business agility together with us? Or are you ok to live with the burdon of not knowing?

Leo
Bram
Georges
Vincent
Joke
Ellen

Back to program

Develop Healthy Relationships at Work Using the Integral Theory and Integral Coaching

Peter Moreno

This session is to discover a new understanding of human relationships and how to sustain them using the Integral Theory and Integral Coaching. This is a key element to archive goals with less stress. It is also to promote efficiency and motivation in individuals and groups. Come to learn new tools and get profound insights about what happens within the mind and hearts of human beings.

Goal of the session: 1. New understanding of professional and personal relationships2. An introduction to the Integral Theory of Ken Wilber3. Working with Integral Coaching4. Tools and experiences to improve your relationships
Expected experience: Interest in Team Building, Coaching Teams and Individuals
Session Type: interactive presentation

Have you notice the amount of issues that are just misunderstandings or personality conflicts?. Have you come to discover that when personal issues are addressed and solved the process works better (Scrum, Kanban, XP, etc)?

Most people wants peace and happiness at work, also people want to feel safe and encourage to express the best of themself at work, but this is certainly not the experience of many people. This session will attempt to answer a central question, why human relationships are not healthy all the time?…

From this understanding we will address the solution from the perspective of the Integral Theory and Coaching.

We will also explore this question: How to develop and sustain healthy relationships at work?

This talk is based on my experience working as Agile Coach/Scrum Master in Europe. My current client is Proximus in Brussels, Belgium. This is the largest Telecom Company in Belgium.

Here is a summary of the topics I would like to share with the community:

1# Integral Coaching and the Integral Theory applied at work
2# How to identify and work with unhealthy relationship patters at work (control, judgment, manipulation, blame, complain)
3# How to support people on transcending their Ego structures to develop healthy relationships
4# Quick-start tools to generate a healthy working environment

I am sure this session will contribute to your evolution as human being and also to your teams as you become for conscious of your own ego patters. This session is to discover a new understanding of human relationships and how to sustain them to make them last.


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Where does it hurt?

Bring your agile problem to the agile coaches clinic

Marc Lainez

Have a problem with implementing agile? Make an appointment with an experienced agile coach at the Coaches Clinic to get some fresh ideas to start making improvements tomorrow.

The Coaches Clinic is a free service for the conference attendees. You can get free help from experienced coaches recruited from the conference audience.

During the day you'll be able to sign up for an appointment with a coach.

Goal of the session: Get some fresh ideas to solve your most pressing agile problem
Intended audience: Everybody who has a problem
Session Type: 90 min workshop

Have a problem with implementing agile? Make an appointment with an experienced agile coach at the Coaches Clinic to get some fresh ideas to start making improvements tomorrow.

The Coaches Clinic is a free service for the conference attendees. You can get free help from experienced coaches recruited from the conference audience.

During the day you'll be able to sign up for an appointment with a coach.

Jan
Marieke
Leo
Bram
Philippe
Georges
Vincent
Joke
Hank
Ellen

Back to program

max
30

Everyone can write concurrent code using Test Driven Design? Inconceivable!

Play to learn how to write reliable, tested concurrent and parallel programs

Pascal Van Cauwenberghe & Thien Que Nguyen

Being able to work on concurrent problems and systems is becoming mandatory for everyone in IT. But it looks insanely hard and our familiar tools (like TDD) don't seem to work.

Come and play part of our Parallel Human Computer. We'll "program" (teach) you using TDD. Once programmed, you'll solve a complicated puzzle easily by collaborating with the other participants "inside" the computer.

You'll see that it's not so hard and really good fun! And maybe you'll start to think differently about systems.

No computers or programming experience required!

Goal of the session: Experience how to test and design concurrent code with the Communicating Sequential Processes model
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: No (concurrent) programming experience required
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning

Being able to work on concurrent problems and systems is becoming mandatory for everyone in IT. But it looks insanely hard and our familiar tools (like TDD) don't seem to work.

Come and play part of our Parallel Human Computer. We'll "program" (teach) you using TDD. Once programmed, you'll solve a complicated puzzle easily by collaborating with the other participants "inside" the computer.

You'll see that it's not so hard and really good fun! And maybe you'll start to think differently about systems.

No computers or programming experience required!

Jan
Marieke
Leo
Bram
Philippe
Hank
Ellen

Back to program

Agile4HR... Hacking corporate culture

Pierre E. Neis

After a one year roadshow in various countries, the first Agile4HR patterns are emerging. Some of them are very useful some of them only inspirational.
People from HR wanted to understand what agile is, and Agile people explained that Agile will change corporate culture and we should co-create a new way of doing things.
The workshop/conference will address:
- the evolution of work
- why Agile culture can help to bind the people with respect to diversity
- Scrum and Scrumban can be seen as management-make-it-easy techniques
- Agile Coaches and Scrum Master as Operational HR people

To make it fun, we will try the Agile Animal Farm game to illustrate all these points.

Goal of the session: Understanding of the impact of Agile in organisational structures and corporate culture.Explaining how Agile and HR should be best friends for ever!
Session Type: 90 min game/simulation

After a one year roadshow in various countries, the first Agile4HR patterns are emerging. Some of them are very useful some of them only inspirational.
People from HR wanted to understand what agile is, and Agile people explained that Agile will change corporate culture and we should co-create a new way of doing things.
The workshop/conference will address:
- the evolution of work
- why Agile culture can help to bind the people with respect to diversity
- Scrum and Scrumban can be seen as management-make-it-easy techniques
- Agile Coaches and Scrum Master as Operational HR people

To make it fun, we will try the Agile Animal Farm game to illustrate all these points.


Back to program

Lean UX: getting out of the deliverables business

Applying lean to User eXperience

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Does the definition and design phase of your product consist out of series of deliverables? Does your project generate large quantities of output like business requirements, wireframes, sitemaps, workflow, visual designs, usability reports, etc. with in-between handovers?

Lean UX brings together design thinking, Lean and Agile principles to the design and User eXperience process. It’s time to get out of the deliverables business and take a lean approach! You will learn how to start from assumptions instead of "requirements", how to do hypothesis-driven development, and the importance of experiments. Join us and learn about the build-measure-learn cycle of Lean UX!

Goal of the session: To learn about Lean UX
Intended audience: Anybody
Expected experience: None
Session Type: 90 min workshop

Does the definition and design phase of your product consist out of series of deliverables? Does your project generate large quantities of output like business requirements, wireframes, sitemaps, workflow, visual designs, usability reports, etc. with in-between handovers?

Lean UX brings together design thinking, Lean and Agile principles to the design and User eXperience process. It’s time to get out of the deliverables business and take a lean approach! You will learn how to start from assumptions instead of "requirements", how to do hypothesis-driven development, and the importance of experiments. Join us and learn about the build-measure-learn cycle of Lean UX!

UX work is mostly about discover, agile (development) work is mostly about delivery. Two worlds - both concerns are necessary. Discovery never stops and discovery without delivery isn't very valuable (Jeff Patton). As such, “Lean UX” is nothing new. In essence, we it’s an approach to bring together user/customer experience; product design and product (software) development, and thereby minimizing the overhead and eliminating as much waste as possible. Up till today, UI/UX/ product design is very much document-deliverables driven. In the setup of cross-functional team, with its highest aim to deliver potentially shippable software increment; there’s no added value to document user interface specifications and designs to the largest detail. Lean UX brings together design thinking and agile development. We focus on a build-measure-learn cycle, and on trying to reduce the cycle time. Attendees will be triggered to think and reflect about their current process. Attendees will learn about the Lean UX cycle (inspired by Lean Start-up principles). Attendees will learn how to formulate requirements into hypotheses; and how to focus on user testing and learning from that testing. Attendees will also learn about techniques to bring UX/VD people and software development people together. This workshop is based on the book "Lean UX", by Jeff Gothelf.

Jan
Marieke
Leo
Bram
Philippe
Georges
Vincent
Joke
Hank
Ellen

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Presenters

Tiago Garcez

Tiago Garcez

Website: http://www.agilar.org

Twitter: @tcgarcez

Consultant, coach, trainer and facilitator. Tiago has worked in multiple large-scale Agile transitions across Europe, supporting change leaders and teams in their continuous improvement efforts. He is passionate about promoting Agile and Lean thinking to organizations and leaders interested in cultivating high performing teams.


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Domenico Musto

Domenico Musto

Twitter: @mimmozzo

Software architect with more than 13 years of experience in developing high volume/performance scalable web applications. In the last few years I've lead the migration to an agile approach of various companies. Londoner and hacker at Cloudhouse.
My job is mainly about architecture, mentoring and implementation of agile practices.The technologies I usually work with are .NET, C# e Ruby.

I am a frequent speaker at international conferences


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Johan Tré

Johan Tré

Website: http://co-learning.be

Twitter: @johan_tre

Being in many organizations as a technical and organizational player Johan learned the values of strategic tools and methods within software land.
Holding this in the light of an agile, holistic, complexity vision fuels these recurring values with their contribution as fundamental bricks to build successful organizations.
It is envisioning the gravity field of these building blocks and the ability to pass that on to others that offers the most direct path to insight.
The need for passing on these insights for the benefit of efficiency became passion.

Simply because helping people to become autonomously self-improving is what matters.


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Annelies De Meyere

Annelies De Meyere

Website: http://co-learning.be

Twitter: @endimi

Annelies tumbled into Agile by proxy through her husband and the interesting network she encountered, and started mixing these newly discovered skills in her day-to-day work as Service Manager in a high security environment. Feeling the need for better communication across teams and levels within organisations, Annelies made the switch to become an Agile coach via Co-Learning. Helping companies adapt towards a more flexible way of working, better communication, guiding teams towards better results and facilitating change management. She is now a brainstorm facilitator, trainer and coach for teams and individuals, Management 3.0 practitioner, Certified LeSS Practitioner and Certified Orange Belt Innovation Games Architect.


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Frances Place

Frances Place

Twitter: @Francessss

Frances Place is an account manager at digital agency White October based in Oxford, UK. She has a close working relationship with clients, particularly in the early phases of their projects where the focus is on product strategy and helping them define the detail and priorities of the work.
With a particular interest in lean start-up methodology, Frances runs consultancy work with clients which includes user story mapping and customer discovery work, helping them to define and test their core value propositions before creating a plan for the development of their product.
White October creates digital products by putting people first – discovering what customers really want, working unusually closely with clients and supporting our teams to succeed.


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Ben Linders

Ben Linders

Twitter: @BenLinders

Ben Linders is an Independent Consultant in Agile, Lean, Quality and Continuous Improvement, based in The Netherlands. Author of Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives, Waardevolle Agile Retrospectives & What Drives Quality.

As an adviser, coach and trainer he helps organizations by deploying effective software development and management practices. He focuses on continuous improvement, collaboration and communication, and professional development, to deliver business value to customers.

Ben is an active member of networks on Agile, Lean and Quality, and a frequent speaker and writer. He shares his experience in a bilingual blog (Dutch and English), as an editor for Agile at InfoQ and as an expert on TechTarget. Follow him on twitter: @BenLinders.


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Thierry de Pauw

Thierry de Pauw

Website: http://thinkinglabs.io

Twitter: @tdpauw

Jack of all trades, master of none (aka full stack developer). Longtime (15+ years) software engineer, apprentice devops. Passionate about software development in the broad sense. In continuous search for simple, easy to understand design and solutions.

I like to help teams in creating meaningful software, with a keen eye for code quality and software delivery process - from customer interaction to continuous delivery. Instead of balancing quality & delivery, I believe and practice that better quality is actually a way to more and better deliveries.


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Jan De Baere

Jan is an Agile coach. His focus is towards business benefit and people. The last 5+ years he focused on Scaling Agile, introducing agile in companies like GDF Suez, ING...


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Gertjan Deserrano

Gertjan Deserrano

Twitter: @GertjanDes

Gertjan Deserrano is an Agile coach with an analytical view on improving processes and guiding teams towards an open mindset. The past 10 years he worked as a back office agent, functional analyst, ScrumMaster, team lead and Agile Coach within Telecommunication at Telenet, Warehouse management solutions at Nike, Finance sector at Argenta and ING for Cegeka. The last 4 years of his career Gertjan has focused on helping Lean and Agile transformations. First on team level as a Change agent and ScrumMaster, later on project and organizational level as an Agile coach. Currently he is assisting ING Belgium as Agile Coach in its Agile Transformation.


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George Dinwiddie

George Dinwiddie

Twitter: @gdinwiddie

George Dinwiddie helps organizations develop software more effectively. He brings thirty-five years of development experience from electronic hardware and embedded firmware to business information technology. He helps organizations, managers, and teams solve the problems they face by providing consulting, coaching, mentoring and training at the organizational, process, team, interpersonal, and technical levels. Involved in the Agile community since 2000, he has helped groups ranging from 8 developers to a Fortune 100 company and a billion dollar federal program. He is a frequent presenter at conferences such as the Agile Conference, Agile Development Practices, Agile Testing Days and numerous regional and focused conferences, and has been published in print and on-line magazines.


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Michel Van den Borne

As a team & change facilitator, I help leaders and their teams to take, together, committing decisions and implement meaningful changes that produce concrete results.
I also propose training in change management, decision-making, team collaboration and performance management.
I have worked as financial controller and consultant, specialized in financial processes (especially budgeting and costing), for more than 15 years. I am now focusing on skills and attitudes needed for building effective cooperation within groups.
I am Certified Scrum Master, licensed Human Element Practitioner (LHEP), certified Radical Collaboration trainer, Master Practitioner in NLP and certified enneagram trainer.


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Erik Talboom

Twitter: @talboomerik

As a software craftsman I wander around Europe to help and challenge people in they way they deal with code quality and good coding practices. As facilitator of coderetreats and legacycoderetreats I have the pleasure of working with a lot of different people across Europe that are passionate about creating clean and beautiful applications that bring value to their customers. These retreats are a perfect way to practice techniques and for me to experiment with different ways to help people learn about clean code and good code design.


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Koen Metsu

Koen Metsu

Website: http://www.koenmetsu.com

Twitter: @koenmetsu

Koen Metsu is a freelance .NET developer who loves to learn, share and practice everything related to how we build software.
Eight years in the business have left Koen with a passion for simplifying solutions and reducing friction to create better software.

He loves to learn by exploring new languages and building stuff, and rambling about it at an Open Space.
He co-organizes the Belgian Community for Software Craftsmanship and SoCraTes Belgium, a 3-day unconference for developers to discuss and practice their skills.

When he's not doing any of the above, he likes to practice rock climbing, or watch and discuss movies and anime over a good whiskey or beer.


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Valentin Vlacic

Website: http://www.wemanity.com

Twitter: @ValentinVlacic

I got my eyes open when I joined wemanity in September 2014. I used to work in different environments, with traditional management. The least I can say: I didn't feel at ease & didn't fit the model.
I discovered a new way of working thanks to several discussions with colleagues, and we decided to start our own agile transformation, applying these practices to the support team.
Now I'm continuously trying to improve our processes & communication, and shaping my job to fit these values as much as possible: a merger of recruiter & business developer to make my community grow, but with some agile & lean start up in my DNA!


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Artur Margonari

Artur Margonari

Artur is an Agile Transformation Agent and trainer at Wemanity.
He is passionate about how Agile and Lean can change people's way of work for the better and hence how they can provide more value having better collaboration.
He loves all kinds of sources of knowledge and experience sharing, such as trainings, articles, books,
discussion groups and all Agile and Lean events.
His hobbies: guitar + harmonica, special beers, archery, martial arts, languages and traveling.
Ah, yes, certifications: CSM, CSPO, LeSS Practitioner, SAFe Agilist, Management 3.0, Lean Kanban LKU Practitioner.


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Nelis Boucké

Nelis Boucké

Website: http://www.co-learning.be

Twitter: @nelisboucke

Nelis is a consult with a passion for building software and for practices that improve software quality. Most of what he does starts form the observation that the main challenges for great software are typically not in technology, but in fostering collaboration between people. This means that learning and sharing is key to success, both technically and in collaboration.


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Alexander Helleboogh

Alexander Helleboogh

Website: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexanderhelleboogh

Twitter: @lexhelleboogh

Alexander has a passion for building software systems and for practices that improve software quality. He believes that the main challenges for building great software systems are typically not in technology, but in fostering collaboration between people. Alexander is convinced that learning and sharing experiences is key to success, so next to consulting, he invests systematically in attending/speaking on conferences and attending/providing courses.


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Peter Moreno

Peter Moreno

Agile and Integral Coach, Innovator and Speaker. IT Software Engineering Background. Acted as Product Owner, Scrum Master, Project Manager, IT Consultant and Software Developer. Vast experience in HealthCare product development. Worked with multicultural teams in Europe and Latam.

Active speaker in the Agile Community. Passionate about integrating IT Knowledge and Soft Skills such as Emotional Intelligence, Leadership, Mindfulness and Human Evolution.

I started my journey in Santiago, Chile. During this period I worked for several projects in the Latam region (Brazil, Argentina, Chile, etc).

In 2011 I was invited to come to Europe to join the AGFA R&D Center. I worked there for 3 years as Product Manager and Agile mindset promoter.

I am now working as Agile Coach/Scrum Master to support companies on their transition to Agile software development. Happy to contribute and collaborate with any company looking for a better way of working. The combination of both SOFT and hard skills is part of my personal style for Agile Coaching.

As a parallel initiative, I started my personal growth development in 2009. Exploring areas such leadership, emotional intelligence, mindfulness, human psychology and spirituality. My passion about these topics is constantly growing and my effort to combine both IT Knowledge and human awareness is one of the main drivers for my human and professional evolution.

- See more at: https://www.scrumalliance.org/myaccount#sthash.ZWYJ3PQU.dpuf

I have 4-5 years of experience in Agile Software Development
3 Years in Integral Coaching / Formal Education in the Integral Coaching Canada School
7+ Years Working with the Integral Theory and Personal Dev.
Enneagram Expert
Non-Violent Communication Practitioner
Life Coach with a very active practice in Belgium
Speaker in the Agile Community (Scrum Gathering Paris, Spain, BE etc)


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Marc Lainez


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Pascal Van Cauwenberghe

Pascal Van Cauwenberghe

Website: https://nayima.be

Twitter: @pascalvc

Pascal Van Cauwenberghe is a consultant based in Brussels who tries to solve more problems than he creates. To do this, he uses Agile, Lean, Theory of Constraints and Systems Thinking techniques.

He’s one of the founders of the Belgian XP group and one of the organizers of XP Days Benelux. One day he and Vera Peeters invented the “XP Game“, because they couldn’t explain XP to their team and customers. They’ve learned that games are an ideal way to learn. Since then he tries to transform work into play…


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Thien Que Nguyen

Did you ever encounter teams having difficulty working together?
Or did you ever experience a company where no one knows the whole process, only bits and pieces?
Or is your team working day and night and still nothing gets done?

I help teams to create serious improvement by using LEAN values/thinking, playing system thinking games, by making bottlenecks visible, but mostly by letting people experience the issues.

One team reduced their lead time from 5 weeks to 5 working days. Another team regained their creativity and fun. And this gave them back their control to change their work in small visible steps.


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Pierre E. Neis

Pierre E. Neis

Twitter: @elpedromajor

Pierre, Senior Lean Agile Coach, launched October 2014 an initiative called Agile4HR to bind HR and Agile people.
80% of my time transforming organisation into Agile Organisations
5% training people
10% facilitating workshop and conferencing
5% try to imagine a better work life balance


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Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Twitter: @vfrederik

Frederik is getting back on track with honest and exciting product/software development by living and advocating agile/lean. I'd like to describe myself as a multi-disciplinary, cross-functional worker. I don't like specific “job titles”, the best fit would be “business” consultant, as the past 10 years of consultancy I have mostly been active to bridge the gap (grand canyon) between business and any other stakeholders. Actually, I am in an early mid-career crisis and recovering from the pains of too much sequential software projects. Fortunately life is beautiful and there are exciting times ahead. I'm fast-tracking as facilitator, coach, creative networker. Regarding the paper certifications: CSM, CSPO, Lean UX, Scaling Scrum Fundamentals (LeSS).


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Participants

Jan
Jan

Jan has been working as a programmer for 5 years now. Jan loves to program. He knows a lot of languages, and a lot of tools. At work, he he is not always happy because the circumstances often force him to deliver the quality he knows he can reach. Jan explores new technologies and trends on the internet and in books and magazines. At night Jan contributes to an open source project together with 10 other guys, from all over the world. That's where he heard about agile methodologies. In the open source group, he is used to work with unit tests, but he hopes to get some real in-depth tips and tricks from experts at the ATBru conference. He is also interested to learn about the latest trends for continuous intergration tools and test automation.

Meet Jan at the following sessions

Marieke
Marieke

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis. Several months ago, her team had an introductory training on extreme programming and scrum. Some of the ideas she learned about seemed interesting enough, but she is not sure if this methodology is applicable in their particular situation. After the course, some of her colleagues started to write unit tests, but there still are only a few, and they are not run very often, as far as Marieke can see. They also started to do a daily standup meeting, because according to the trainers that is a tool to enhance communication within the team. But these meetings are rather boring, and they tend to take 1/2 hour, every day. Team members are grumbling about wasting their time.

Marieke started to think all this agile stuff is only an unusable hype. But then she heard about ATBru, and she thought "well, let's give it another chance, if 150 people go to this conference, for 11 years in a row now, maybe there is more to it". She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have applied these techniques, which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.

Meet Marieke at the following sessions

Leo
Leo

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. Over the years, Leo has been working as a developer, as a project lead, as a tester, as an analyst, as a manager, and as a consultant. He knows from experience that everything comes back, if you only wait a few years. He has learned that the same problems and the same solutions have been invented and re-invented a hundred times in computer science. He has lived through the rise and fall of uncountable new technologies and methodogies. All of them brand new, all of them the one and only forever best way to make software. Leo wants to go to ATBru because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.

Meet Leo at the following sessions

Bram
Bram

Bram has never missed an ATBru. He has been to several other conferences in Europe, and also attended quite a few bigger agile and other conferences. Bram likes the ATBru, because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from ATBru full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.

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Philippe
Philippe

Philippe comes to ATBru because his boss told him to go. He has never heard about this agile stuff. He doesn't know what it is, or what it can be used for. He guesses it is something his boss wants to buy. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.

mmm I think maybe it is not very useful for Philippe to come to the ATBru? -Vera

Why not? Let Philippe come, let him relax and have a beer and dinner with agile people. He might even attend some presentations. And, once he's relaxed, who knows what could happen? --Pascal

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Georges
Georges

Georges is a project manager. His life is filled with stress, deadlines, difficult programmers, unhappy customers and demanding bosses. Sometimes he wonders if he's chosen the right career.

Lately, Georges has been hearing more and more about agile methods. Some of his ex-colleagues have converted from project management to agile coaching. They tell him tales of vibrant, exciting, fun projects where customers and developers live in perfect harmony. That can't be true. They must be exaggerating. Or are they....?

Meet Georges at the following sessions

Vincent
Vincent

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. His teams don't do too badly. Some projects are allright; some don't fully satisfy their users. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. So, Vincent looks around for solutions that might help him to create and implement the plan. He has looked at a lot of things: processes, tools, consultants... He's heard that some other companies (even some reputable companies) have had success with "agile" methods, so he comes to the ATBru to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him. He doesn't know what to expect. Hippy surfer dudes? 18 year old wizz kids with piercings? Greybearded hackers? Oh well... What does he have to lose?

Meet Vincent at the following sessions

Joke
Joke

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke understands her customers needs, she has lots of ideas for new features that would enhance the product. She knows that this product really enhances its user's lives. That's one of the reasons her company is so succesful. But they have trouble keeping up with customer demand. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. If only she and the development team could work together more efficiently, they could make this product make more of a difference. Maybe this "agile" stuff can help? How does product management work in agile projects? Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.

Meet Joke at the following sessions

Hank
Hank

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. Appalled and bemused by the shocking waste of time, money, and people, he does his best to bring the joy back in the life of those around him by introducing agile methodologies wherever he sees the opportunity. Hank comes to the ATBru to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.

Meet Hank at the following sessions

Ellen
Ellen

Ellen is an agile coach. She's been using agile methods for a few years now. XP, SCRUM, Lean... it doesn't matter much to her. She's more interested in doing things that matter to deliver value for her customers. She wants to work with a happy team, doing meaningful work.

Ellen wants to learn new ideas and share experience of techniques that work. She comes to ATBru because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.

Meet Ellen at the following sessions